Festivals

Roxy Coss: “The lack of female representation in Jazz is hurting us all”

“My role, my job, is to make the best music I can possibly make. Be the best me, create the art I am supposed to put out into the world. I hope this will serve as a positive example for younger female musicians, because right now they don’t have very many examples to follow. I also hope this serves as an example to my male counterparts and younger male musicians of what a successful female musician can look like.”

James Mustafa: “The Melbourne Big Band Festival will celebrate the diverse, inspiring and kickass large ensemble scene of Australian music”

“The big band orchestration is genius. The instrumentation of five saxes/woodwind, four trombones, 4-5 trumpets and a four – piece rhythm section results in literally countless and millions of different compositional formulas that will never be exhausted, even if every composer in the world was to write for the next thousand years.”

Shannon Barnett: “The Wangaratta Jazz Festival shows what a lively bunch of people our community can be”

“I grew up looking up to musicians like Andrea Keller and Sandy Evans, because I could see that they had their own bands, were writing their own music and were totally accepted and respected by the jazz community. I saw that it was possible to have a career in music.”

Adrian Jackson: “We continue to take risks at Wangaratta”

“I feel lucky to have wandered into the position of doing a job that I enjoy and find rewarding, and to do it for so many years. The highlight has probably been having the chance to work with so many musicians who I hold in such high regard ; to propose or develop projects with them ; and then to see it all come together onstage, to be met with such generous approval by the audience.”

Mama Alto at Melbourne Fringe

With influences including American icons such as Billie Holiday and Sarah Vaughan, alongside less known but no less luminous talents such as Carmen McRae, Roberta Flack, former Supreme turned balladeer Mary Wilson, and New Zealand expat Bridgette Allen, Mama Alto’s sound remains idiosyncratic and unique, partly due to her luscious and gender transcendent voice which has drawn critical acclaim and audience admiration.

Ingrid James: “the Brisbane Vocal Jazz Festival hopes to celebrate the diversity of the jazz vocal art form”

” It’s our intention to make this yearly event a flagship for Queensland Vocal Jazz by providing significant career opportunities, job creation and promotion of jazz artists. We want to celebrate the diversity of the jazz vocal art form which encompasses everything from original works to original reinterpretations of jazz standards – mainstream and contemporary as well as jazz vocal improvisation.”