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Sean Foran: “If you’re curious as to how modern jazz could be interpreted into dance, come take a look!”

“We’re always watching the dancers and responding to them – sometimes closely following the actions with musical cues, at other times creating a dynamic and textural sense of the emotion in the dance through the music. On the other hand, the dancers are listening to us and responding, taking their timing cues from us sometimes.”

Harry Mitchell: “Perth is a really unique environment for young people playing jazz”

“I wanted to surround myself with musicians that made me want to play. I would have been happy just to sit back listen to them play together in that setting. Apart from how easy I find it to make music with them, they all have strong personal voices and I wanted them to put their own mark on my tunes, which they did”.

Selene Messinis: “Each ISM tune can be a journey in many different worlds all at once”

We all composed three tunes each for the album, having the other members in mind. There are a lot of different moods because we have different compositional styles. Maddie writes a lot of quirky, frantic compositions, still heavily rhythmically driven, with lots of space for free improvisation and Isaac would write more traditional jazz tunes with beautiful melodies. I care so much about rhythm and keeping time and groove, that in my compositions theres usually a lot of business in rhythmic patterns and ideas with very simple melodies.

Paul Grabowsky: “Bob Dylan is a prophet”

“The fact that I’m interested in his music should come as no surprise, as he is a truly great songwriter, and most jazz musicians love great songs. The only difference between Dylan and say Jerome Kern is the musical and lyrical structure of Dylans work, which tends to narrative and abstraction, often in strophic form. But there are plenty of examples of more lyrical songs as well.” ‘Just Like a Woman’, ‘Lay, Lady Lay’, ‘Forever Young’, ‘Don’t Think Twice’, ‘It’s all over now, baby blue’…the list goes on and on.

Tamara Kuldin: “I love being a storyteller!”

” I think my stage persona is just a more magnified version of myself. It’s important for me that the audience feel connected and involved. I don’t just want to sing ‘at’ them. I like having a bit of a chat…and yes, sometimes the chatter does get a little cheeky, but I don’t think the audience mind! If the audience are at ease, relaxed and happy…then so am I! It’s also about the songs. Each song has a story…I love being the storyteller.”

Roxy Coss: “The lack of female representation in Jazz is hurting us all”

“My role, my job, is to make the best music I can possibly make. Be the best me, create the art I am supposed to put out into the world. I hope this will serve as a positive example for younger female musicians, because right now they don’t have very many examples to follow. I also hope this serves as an example to my male counterparts and younger male musicians of what a successful female musician can look like.”