Sam Cottell

Samuel Cottell is a pianist, arranger and composer based in Sydney. Currently Samuel is completing his PhD in Musicology at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, where he is writing about the music of Maestro Tommy Tycho. Samuel has contributed entries to the Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians and is currently writing about big bands in the Sydney Jazz scene. In his spare time he enjoys drinking a strong cup of coffee.

Samuel Cottell is a pianist, arranger and composer based in Sydney. Currently Samuel is completing his PhD in Musicology at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, where he is writing about the music of Maestro Tommy Tycho. Samuel has contributed entries to the Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians and is currently writing about big bands in the Sydney Jazz scene. In his spare time he enjoys drinking a strong cup of coffee.

An Evolving Francesca Prihasti

“I am very grateful for the opportunity each day to create music and I would love to keep on writing because the more I do it, the more I can discover my own musical voice and it will help me evolve and develop as an artist. Change doesn’t happen instantly. It happens gradually and I want to strive to honing my craft each day”.

James Mustafa- Renaissance Man

Mustafa’s sound is a coalescence of classical and jazz sounds, two passions which he has cultivated over a number of years. Listening to large orchestral music, particularly Romantic era works, Mustafa loved the way that the parts of the orchestra worked together (and he further explores this in his jazz writing) “It comes back to the fact that I love textures and instrumental colours. I think that is reflective in my playing as well”, he says.

Album review: Paul Williamson Live

Live (Jazzhead) Paul Williamson Quartet Review by Samuel Cottell Trumpeter Paul Williamson has an incredible ability to create diverse musical landscapes with other performers. His previous album, Connect Four, saw him engage with four different pianists and create some exciting music. In the follow up to Connect Four, The Paul Williamson Quartet: LIVE (his ninth album) explores …

Gig review: Evan Lohning Jazz Orchestra

In his writing, Lohning allows plenty of room for the soloists to have their say with their own voice and – often playing understated piano – would at times rise from his place at the keys and direct the band with enthusiasm. His arrangements had the audiences tapping their feet and applauding. A general feeling of happiness and well-being filling the room, particularly after Lohning’s composition in the style of Count Basie, ‘Stand Up and Be Counted’, which concluded the first set.